Can policy reverse the heart disease epidemic?

heart disease epidemic

Heart disease is the number one killer of Americans. And while most people know the basics of how to keep their heart healthy – exercise regularly, don’t smoke, eat healthy, have an annual physical – most people simply can’t. To be sure, this isn’t a blame game. Many people live in food deserts and don’t have access to healthy ... Read More...

Paula Chavez: A True Story of Transformation

heart disease story

No more guilt. No more excuses.  Those two phrases have become the mantra that Paula Chavez lives by when it comes to her health. It started after her second child was born in 2010. Chavez was extremely overweight and her cholesterol was high. In fact, she was ashamed by her appearance and how bad her health had slipped. And she was only 32 ... Read More...

Start a Smart Heart Exercise Program

heart exercise program

Nearly 70 percent of Americans don't get enough exercise, says the American Heart Association. Yet, inactivity remains one of the major risk factors for heart disease. Exercise is essential to heart health, but getting motivated is hard. Need some reasons to make exercise a regular habit? Exercise, along with good nutrition, can help ... Read More...

Women vs. Men: Who is more at risk for a heart attack?

risk for a heart attack

Men vs. Women. It’s the age-old comparison, but it turns out there are key differences to how each gender should approach the health of their heart. While heart disease is one of the leading causes of death for both sexes, research shows that physicians are often less aggressive in treating women, despite the fact that heart disease is ... Read More...

Vitals has heart

heart health

Vitals is in the red this February – figuratively speaking. We’re celebrating Heart Health Awareness Month along with the American Heart Association. The month is dedicated to increasing awareness about the dangers of heart disease for women. While heart disease is a major problem for all, it is the leading cause of death among women. Women ... Read More...

Kegels for Men? Yes!

Kegels aren't just for women. Men can benefit from this exercise as well.

Kegels are usually spoken of in relation to women because they are more likely to suffer from urinary incontinence, but Kegel exercises are also highly recommended for men. Not only do men also face the same urinary and bowel incontinence issues that women do, these pelvic floor-strengthening exercises also help to improve prostate and sexual ... Read More...

Weight and Incontinence

Dr. Karen Noblett explains why being overweight can increase a woman's chances of experiencing incontinence.

The following is the third post in a series on overactive bladder (OAB) by Dr. Karen Noblett, a California based OB/GYN and expert in urinary incontinence and overactive bladder. There are many factors that can impact a woman’s likelihood of developing a pelvic floor disorder (PFD). In addition to age, vaginal childbirth, menopause, and ... Read More...

Roundup: Good Foods for Incontinence

Cranberries are a great food for incontinence.

The following is the second post in a series on overactive bladder (OAB) by Dr. Karen Noblett, a California based OB/GYN and expert in urinary incontinence and overactive bladder. For women suffering from incontinence, there are a number of ways to improve their condition through both medical and surgical means. However, incorporating ... Read More...

Potty Talk: Discussing Bladder Health With Our Doctors

Dr. Karen Noblett, expert on overactive bladder and urinary incontinence.

The following is the inaugural post in a series on overactive bladder (OAB) by Dr. Karen Noblett, a California based OB/GYN and expert in urinary incontinence and overactive bladder. Overactive bladder (OAB), a bladder-related pelvic floor disorder (PFD), is not a normal part of aging. There are easy solutions and women do not have to suffer ... Read More...

Pelvic Floor Exercises: Why You’re Doing It Wrong

Performing pelvic floor exercises are important for women with urge incontinence.

Pelvic floor exercises, also known as Kegel exercises, strengthen the pelvic floor muscles that help support the uterus, bladder, small intestine, and rectum. These muscles can be weakened in women due to pregnancy, childbirth, aging, surgery, or being overweight. As these muscles are important to a woman's ability to control her bladder and ... Read More...